Chapter 4. Apartment Buildings in the Latter Half of the 20th Century – Hungarian Projects

Table of Contents

Zoltán Kiss, Apartment Building, Délibáb Street, District VI, Budapest, 1954
Károly Weichinger–Csaba Virág, OTP Apartments, Liszt Ferenc Square, District VII/VI, Budapest, 1961
Zoltán Gulyás, OTP Apartments, Rumbach Sebestyén Street, District VII, Budapest, 1963
György Vedres, OTP Apartments, Bem Embankment, District I, Budapest, 1962
György Jánossy, Apartments, Úri Street No. 38, District I, Budapest, 1963
Tibor Tenke, Medium-Rise Apartment Houses of an Experimental Housing Estate, Budapest, XXII, 1963
Lajos Schmidt, Apartments, Gellérthegy Street, District I, Budapest, 1965
György Tokár - Attila Emődy, Apartments, Hajnóczy József Street, District XII, Budapest, 1965
János Sedlmayr, Apartments, Tárnok Street No. 7, District I, Budapest, 1964
Béla Borvendeg, Apartments, Szeged, Oskola Street, 1968
Levente Varga, Terrace House, Lévay Street No. 8, District II, Budapest, 1967–1969
Csaba Virág, White Dove House, Úri Street, District I, Budapest, 1969
Zoltán Farkasdy - Attila Kenessey, Apartments in the Castle District, Dísz Square, District I, Budapest, 1970
Zoltán Farkasdy, Apartments, Úri Street, District I, Budapest, 1970
Mrs János Sedlmayr, Apartments, Hátsókapu Street, Sopron, 1971
Olga Mináry, Apartment Buildings, Hankóczy Jenő Street, District II, Budapest, 1974
Lajos Horváth, Infill Development in the Castle District, Úri Street, District I, Budapest, 1972
Károly Jurcsik, Apartments, Toboz Street, District III, Budapest, 1977

Zoltán Kiss, Apartment Building, Délibáb Street, District VI, Budapest, 1954

Architect Zoltán Kiss chose Neo-Classicist architectural prototypes evoking the Reform Age of Hungarian history rather than forms preferred by contemporary Social-Realism characteristic of the period. Featuring simple forms, the concept of this residential building may be considered as up-to-date, and it actually bears the stylistic features of contemporary architecture such as the accentuated symmetry, ornate central spatial organisation, simple and proportional mass expression, as well as carefully designed details. However, the exterior design, the layout of openings along the façade and the interior floor layout appear somewhat disharmonious. Entrances to the apartments are accessible via a central gallery with a skylight. The rooms of the single- and two-room dwellings open from a central living space.

exterior

© ismeretlen, source: http://bellearc.blogspot.hu/2012/11/nemausus-jean-nouvel.html

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© ismeretlen, source: http://bellearc.blogspot.hu/2012/11/nemausus-jean-nouvel.html

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© faasdant, source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/faasdant/5641577857/sizes/o/in/photostream/

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© luis186104, source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/luis186104/5359136899/sizes/o/in/photostream/

interior

© ismeretlen, source: http://littlearchitectinparis.wordpress.com/2012/07/01/nemausus-jean-nouvel/l1070160/

site plan

© Jean Nouvel, source: Hilary French: Key Urban Housing of the Twentieth Century, Lawrence King Publishing, London, 2008, 122. o

floor plan

© Jean Nouvel, source: Hilary French: Key Urban Housing of the Twentieth Century, Lawrence King Publishing, London, 2008, 122. o

cross-section

© Jean Nouvel, source: Hilary French: Key Urban Housing of the Twentieth Century, Lawrence King Publishing, London, 2008, 122. o

Károly Weichinger–Csaba Virág, OTP Apartments, Liszt Ferenc Square, District VII/VI, Budapest, 1961

Built in the neighbourhood of the Music Academy in the 1960s, this building is an interesting and reserved apartment house with Modernist tones that respond to its urban context. Although it is different from other residential developments in the same street, its otherness is far from being disagreeable. It is only at first sight that the simple façade structure, with its fine proportions, aluminium-clad grey parapets and coloured areas, appears slightly angular. The seven storeys contain identical housing levels with four well-functioning apartments on each. The specialty of this building is the ground-floor youth library, functioning ever since its opening with a separate entrance and elegant interiors. The delivery area with a gallery and the reading room with slanted ceilings are fine examples of the innovative solutions that designers realised in the interior spatial organisation.

exterior

© Schall József, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1961/4, Műszaki Könyvkiadó, Budapest

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© Schall József, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1961/4, Műszaki Könyvkiadó, Budapest

detail photo

© Schall József, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1961/4, Műszaki Könyvkiadó, Budapest

detail photo

© Szentirmai Boglárka, source: Szentirmai Boglárka

floor plan

© Weichinger Károly / Virág Csaba, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1961/4, Műszaki Könyvkiadó, Budapest

floor plan

© Weichinger Károly / Virág Csaba, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1961/4, Műszaki Könyvkiadó, Budapest

Zoltán Gulyás, OTP Apartments, Rumbach Sebestyén Street, District VII, Budapest, 1963

Zoltán Gulyás was one of the most acknowledged Hungarian architects of his times. This large-scale multi-apartment building was an essential scheme in his oeuvre. The project managed by OTP (the national Hungarian savings bank) to develop a vacant lot bore the concept of settlement. It was in response to the original housing development on the site bordered by three streets. The three bodies create a different context with the streetscape. They follow the site boundaries on Király Street and recede along Rumbach Street to create a plaza. From the direction of Madách Square, they create a terraced façade along the confines of the development. Three characteristic volumes were realised on this enormous site. Appearing on each street, the individual masses do not make physical contact above; they only meet along the ground floor’s unbroken frame. Economy was a priority concerning both the apartments contained in the buildings (they are typically two-room and single-room with a hall) and the numbers of tiers (2 and 4 respectively). The floor plan organisation and the façade wrapped in clinker brick cladding combined with various materials – all reflect the orderliness and thoroughness so characteristic of the architect.

exterior

© Szentirmai Boglárka, source: Szentirmai Boglárka

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© Szentirmai Boglárka, source: Szentirmai Boglárka

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© Gulyás Zoltán, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1963/3, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

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© Gulyás Zoltán, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1963/3, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

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© Gulyás Zoltán, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1963/3, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

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© Gulyás Zoltán, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1963/3, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

interior

© Szentirmai Boglárka, source: Szentirmai Boglárka

floor plan

© Gulyás Zoltán, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1963/3, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

cross-section

© Gulyás Zoltán, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1963/3, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

György Vedres, OTP Apartments, Bem Embankment, District I, Budapest, 1962

One of the landmarks along the Danube bank in the 1960s, this is a building with character. Free-standing on three sides, the six-storey apartment house with a roof superstructure turns towards the square with a cantilevered mass projecting over the ground floor. The rhythm of the rooms jutting out at oblique angles and the loggias in between them lend this owner-occupied apartment house a unique atmosphere. Excellent architectural ideas of the design include out-of-plane dynamics and the loggia system, since it optimized the orientation advantageously for each apartment to have a river view. The roof superstructure, which counteracts the horizontal nature of the building, is retracted from the mass and extended by a gorgeous roof terrace with panoramic views.

aerial view

© Vedres György, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1963/3, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

exterior

© Vedres György, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1963/3, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

exterior

© Szentirmai Boglárka, source: Szentirmai Boglárka

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© Szentirmai Boglárka, source: Szentirmai Boglárka

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© Szentirmai Boglárka, source: Szentirmai Boglárka

detail photo

© Szentirmai Boglárka, source: Szentirmai Boglárka

floor plan

© Vedres György, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1963/3, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

György Jánossy, Apartments, Úri Street No. 38, District I, Budapest, 1963

Located along the so-called Bástyasétány (Bastion Promenade) in the Castle District of Buda, this corner building harmoniously blends in with its environment. Bearing the features of contemporary Modernism, it is a remarkable design of Hungarian architecture. As a result of the up-to-date method of development, the apartments are contained within one mass. As the closed and open staircase connects with the courtyard wing of the old structure, the atmosphere of the internal courtyard and the passage echo that of the castle. The mature floor-plan system is organised by sequencing four duplex apartments plus a studio flat on each level. The two-storey design was a deliberate choice, as the changing rhythm of the wall planes on the façade and that of the windows allowed for a more organic connection between the new building and its environment. Jánossy’s habit as a designer was one of perfectionalism combined with careful attention to details. This restrained, well-proportioned and elegant building was well ahead of its time.

exterior

© Dobos Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1967/2, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

exterior

© Szentirmai Boglárka, source: a szerző

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© Szentirmai Boglárka, source: a szerző

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© Szentirmai Boglárka, source: a szerző

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© Horler Miklós, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1967/2, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

exterior

© Horler Miklós, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1967/2, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

floor plan

© Jánossy György, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1967/2, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

floor plan

© Jánossy György, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1967/2, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

cross-section

© Jánossy György, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1967/2, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

Tibor Tenke, Medium-Rise Apartment Houses of an Experimental Housing Estate, Budapest, XXII, 1963

This experimental housing estate in Budafok is a remarkable medium-height high-rise constructed with sliding shutter pre-cast wall technology. The 11 storeys of the apartment building with 5 dwelling units strung along side by side on each level extrapolate a clear floor plan structure. The interior spatial organisation of the flats may be considered innovative because of its internal partition system, which residents could rearrange to their liking. The designs of built-in furnishing also reflect the concept of flexibility. The 50 apartments were designed to suit various, versatile needs with floor plans to accommodate 4, 3 and 2 people respectively. To connect the high-rise with the amenity centres seemed like a modern idea then. This way, the floor spaces of the ancillary rooms in the apartments could be reduced in favour of living areas.

exterior

© dr. Illyésné (TTI), source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1966/4

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© dr. Illyésné (TTI), source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1966/4

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© dr. Illyésné (TTI), source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1966/4

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© dr. Illyésné (TTI), source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1966/4

interior

© dr. Illyésné (TTI), source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1966/4

site plan

© Tenke Tibor, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1966/4

floor plan

© Tenke Tibor, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1966/4

cross-section

© Tenke Tibor, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1966/4

Lajos Schmidt, Apartments, Gellérthegy Street, District I, Budapest, 1965

Bordered by three streets at different levels, this apartment building creates a characteristic completion in the area called Tabán with its versatile façade design. The scheme responds to a sensitive site which is a prominent part of the cityscape, as well as to the topography of the location, allowing for views of the neighbourhood, the Castle and the protected historic buildings surrounding it. This development closely follows the shift in level between Naphegy and Gellérthegy Streets with its long flanking wing seated onto the terrain from the direction of Tabán Park. The tightly and clearly organised composition is completed by the mass that is adapted to the neighbouring development from the lower Gellérthegy Street. The split-level apartments of the block are strung along the cubes of the two-tier staircase. The rationally organised two-room apartments contain the service functions on the side facing the courtyard. The living rooms’ glass surfaces overlook the adjacent park and hillside, while wrap-around loggias – resulting from the split-level structure – lend the owner-occupied apartment house’s façade a characteristic rhythm and dynamism.

exterior

© Schmidt Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1965/3, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

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© Schmidt Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1965/3, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

exterior

© Schmidt Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1965/3, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

detail photo

© Schmidt Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1965/3, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

exterior

© Schmidt Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1965/3, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

floor plan

© Schmidt Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1965/3, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

cross-section

© Schmidt Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1965/3, Műszaki könyvkiadó, Budapest

György Tokár - Attila Emődy, Apartments, Hajnóczy József Street, District XII, Budapest, 1965

Differing from the neighbouring buildings, this is a high-standard infill development, a daring and characteristic architectural work of the period. The strengths of the design are first of all the exemplary floor plan configuration and the high-standard design of the courtyard façade. The building was actually realised by integrating the floor plans of two transitional flats and two studios on each level. In line with the concept, the eight-storey apartment house features a characteristic and prominent appearance, views of the Castle and out-of-plane bay windows necessitated by the disadvantageous street-orientation to optimize exposure to sunshine. The vertical façade structure is counteracted by the brick cladding and the horizontal nature of the R-C roofing.

exterior

© Rácz György, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1965/3

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© Rácz György, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1965/3

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© Rácz György, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1965/3

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© Rácz György, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1965/3

interior

© Rácz György, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1965/3

floor plan

© Tokár György / Emődy Attila, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1965/3

János Sedlmayr, Apartments, Tárnok Street No. 7, District I, Budapest, 1964

Located on a prominent site in the Castle District, this building is remarkable for its adjustment to the historic environment, the old-and-new context and the architectural standards of its reconstruction. The concept was essentially targeted to preserve the originally U-shaped remains of a walll and the influences of the past and present layered on each other that evoke the atmosphere of the Castle District. The logically configurated floor plan is a fine illustration of the innovative ideas defining interior spatial organisation. The inner courtyard area contains the circulation lane, while the central zone houses the wet areas, and the outer zone features the living rooms. The progressive idea of having duplex apartments in the attic was well ahead of its time. Besides the atmospheric interiors, the refined proportions of exterior mass expression and façade design are the most remarkable characteristics. An important distinguishing feature of the house is the careful attention to details.

exterior

© Dobos Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1966/6

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© Dobos Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1966/6

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© Dobos Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1966/6

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© Dobos Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1966/6

interior

© Dobos Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1966/6

floor plan

© Sedlmayr János, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1966/6

floor plan

© Sedlmayr János, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1966/6

floor plan

© Sedlmayr János, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1966/6

cross-section

© Sedlmayr János, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1966/6

Béla Borvendeg, Apartments, Szeged, Oskola Street, 1968

This infill development is a fine example of up-to-date architectural forms organically blending in with an historic environment. The architect created an integral, modern-style apartment house containing businesses on the ground floor. The essence of the concept was the contemporary revival of the structure and proportions of the old house. The ingenious designs of single-storey, single-room flats and duplex three-room apartments offered as many housing units as needed, while also mimicking the rhythm of the original building. The façade surfaces and the clinker brick cladding are sophisticated references to the past and to the brick architecture of nearby Dóm Square. Pleasant, fine proportions and careful elaboration of details make this house a significant building of its times.

exterior

© SZTV (Buzsáki Ferenc), source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1971/5, Lapkiadó V., Budapest

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© SZTV (Buzsáki Ferenc), source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1971/5, Lapkiadó V., Budapest

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© SZTV (Buzsáki Ferenc), source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1971/5, Lapkiadó V., Budapest

detail photo

© SZTV (Buzsáki Ferenc), source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1971/5, Lapkiadó V., Budapest

exterior

© SZTV (Buzsáki Ferenc), source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1971/5, Lapkiadó V., Budapest

floor plan

© Borvendég Béla, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1971/5, Lapkiadó V., Budapest

floor plan

© Borvendég Béla, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1971/5, Lapkiadó V., Budapest

cross-section

© Borvendég Béla, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1971/5, Lapkiadó V., Budapest

Levente Varga, Terrace House, Lévay Street No. 8, District II, Budapest, 1967–1969

Taking advantage of the terrain, a narrow and steep slope in Buda, this terraced house containing four apartments stands out against the neighbouring buildings with its structural clarity, materiality and elegance. Through shifts in volume – i.e., the terraced design of the units – this owner-occupied multi-apartment house is naturally connected to the vista and its hillside environment. Allowing for the preservation of existing vegetation, the articulation of the building contains semi-open well-proportioned courtyards, so residents may create their own living spaces. The floor plan configuration and clear structuring, as well as the logical connection between structure and materials, are particular strengths of the house. Its living areas are designed with adjustable spatial connections, and there are large expanses of glass on the façade as a result of the inner-core floor plan configuration. Each apartment contained in this terraced house has 2 (+1) rooms on a floor space of 80-85 m². The designer did not only care for the overall planning and details, but also supervised construction. Thanks to both this and the careful work of the artisans, a high-standard apartment building was realised despite the do-it-yourself building style.

exterior

© Varga Levente, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1971/2

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© Varga Levente, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1971/2

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© Varga Levente, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1971/2

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© Varga Levente, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1971/2

interior

© Varga Levente, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1971/2

interior

© Varga Levente, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1971/2

interior

© Varga Levente, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1971/2

floor plan

© Varga Levente, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1971/2

floor plan

© Varga Levente, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1971/2

cross-section

© Varga Levente, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1971/2

Csaba Virág, White Dove House, Úri Street, District I, Budapest, 1969

Standing on a corner site on Úri Street in the Castle District of Buda, this atmospheric infill development is a characteristic apartment house of contemporary architecture featuring individual tones and sensitive tracery. Having an integral architectural character due to its modern forms, materials and well-proportioned façade, the building organically adjusts to its historic environment. The traditional roof form and the up-to-date curtain wall lend the façade structure an exciting duality. The apartments with a strictly organised floor plan system open into the small courtyard via the outside gallery leading to the flats. The restaurant downstairs features carefully detailed interior design, and, in a generous solution, it widens into a plaza towards the street. Thus, it is completely open in this direction with a glass wall.

exterior

© Bognár János és Müller Ferenc, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1969/6

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© Szentirmai Boglárka, source: Szentirmai Boglárka

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© Bognár János és Müller Ferenc, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1969/6

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© Bognár János és Müller Ferenc, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1969/6

interior

© Bognár János és Müller Ferenc, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1969/6

interior

© Bognár János és Müller Ferenc, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1969/6

floor plan

© Virág Csaba, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1969/6

floor plan

© Virág Csaba, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1969/6

cross-section

© Virág Csaba, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1969/6

Zoltán Farkasdy - Attila Kenessey, Apartments in the Castle District, Dísz Square, District I, Budapest, 1970

The integration of this building into its historic context is an exemplary architectural solution. Farkasdy, whose contribution to the Modernist reconstruction of the Castle District is unquestionable, received this commission as the winner of a design competition. The apartment house contains well-conceived, high-standard apartments with rational spatial organisation. Almost symmetrical, the building concludes the square’s northern end like a modest gesture, without overwhelming it, as a self-evident contribution to the context, as if it had always stood there. The strengths of this building are the natural expression of mass, the façade that is free of overexaggerated forms, the atmospheric courtyard, the stairwell and the nicely designed areas with shared functions.

exterior

© Vidovics István, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1972/2

exterior

© Vidovics István, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1972/2

detail photo

© Vidovics István, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1972/2

detail photo

© Vidovics István, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1972/2

exterior

© Vidovics István, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1972/2

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© Vidovics István, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1972/2

exterior

© Szentirmai Boglárka, source: Szentirmai Boglárka

floor plan

© Farkasdy Zoltán / Kenessey Attila, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1972/2

floor plan

© Farkasdy Zoltán / Kenessey Attila, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1972/2

floor plan

© Farkasdy Zoltán / Kenessey Attila, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1972/2

cross-section

© Farkasdy Zoltán / Kenessey Attila, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1972/2

Zoltán Farkasdy, Apartments, Úri Street, District I, Budapest, 1970

The greatest design work challenge here was the need to preserve the remains of medieval walls, while creating a context to meet the requirements of contemporary architecture. Integrating it into the existing streetscape had its own twist, insofar as Farkasdy, who was also the architect of the neighbouring house a decade earlier, had to adjust to his own designer’s approach. Built on a corner site, this house is defined by modest and simple means of architecture. The ground flloor contains a communal function (coffee shop), while each storey houses two larger and two smaller apartments. The attic is used as a studio. The building adapts to the existing atmosphere with a pitch roof typical of the Castle District.

exterior

© Vidovics István, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1972/2

exterior

© Vidovics István, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1972/2

detail photo

© Vidovics István, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1972/2

exterior

© Szentirmai Boglárka, source: a szerző

exterior

© Szentirmai Boglárka, source: a szerző

interior

© Vidovics István, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1972/2

floor plan

© Farkasdy Zoltán, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1972/2

floor plan

© Farkasdy Zoltán, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1972/2

cross-section

© Farkasdy Zoltán, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1972/2

cross-section

© Farkasdy Zoltán, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1972/2

Mrs János Sedlmayr, Apartments, Hátsókapu Street, Sopron, 1971

Located on a prominent site in Sopron, this infill on a vacant lot is defined by the Modernist style and the adaptation of a consistent language of forms to the historic environment. The designer responded to the sensitive features of the location. The unique, small, triangular site had to be developed with a new building wedged between two dwelling houses of different masses. It had to be accessible via the restored passage of the neighbouring house, from the space of the new stairs. It is an ingeniuous method of development, since the new apartment block does not adhere to the historic hip-roofed building beside it, but remains just the width of one flight of stairs away. This infill development with a carefully designed floor plan system contains a business office on the ground floor, two apartments on the first storey and three duplexes on the second.

exterior

© Dobos Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1973/6, Lapkiadó V., Budapest

exterior

© Dobos Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1973/6, Lapkiadó V., Budapest

exterior

© Dobos Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1973/6, Lapkiadó V., Budapest

floor plan

© Sedlmayr Jánosné, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1973/6, Lapkiadó V., Budapest

floor plan

© Sedlmayr Jánosné, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1973/6, Lapkiadó V., Budapest

cross-section

© Sedlmayr Jánosné, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1973/6, Lapkiadó V., Budapest

Olga Mináry, Apartment Buildings, Hankóczy Jenő Street, District II, Budapest, 1974

Multi-apartment buildings rank amongst the most excellent architectural works of Olga Mináry. Besides functioning as excellent apartment buildings, these two houses with clinker brick cladding in Hankóczy Street have a unique tone. Actually, they are average-size owner-occupied condominiums designed with simple means. Each storey contains two smaller flats with continuous loggias and a larger unit that is open with a loggia on two sides. The floor plans of the units reflect order and structuredness. The functional layout and spatial organisation is a prominent distinguishing feature of the houses. Generous spatial connections compensate for the tightness of the apartments.

exterior

© Mináry Olga, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1974/5

exterior

© Mináry Olga, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1974/5

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© Mináry Olga, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1974/5

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© Mináry Olga, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1974/5

site plan

© Mináry Olga, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1974/5

floor plan

© Mináry Olga, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1974/5

Lajos Horváth, Infill Development in the Castle District, Úri Street, District I, Budapest, 1972

Located in the Castle District at the plaza formed by Úri and Szentháromság Streets, this was the last one of three vacant corner sites to be developed here. Just like the opposite houses, this building is reserved and elegant. Despite the integration of the two sites, it blends in with developments characteristic of the Castle District with its mass and proportions. The consistent and homogeneous streetscape view and sophisticated references evoke the atmosphere of the former council building that had previously occupied the site. An orthogonal geometric design principle creates a transparent structure. The ground floor contains businesses, while the upper floor houses living areas along the street front. The L-shaped corner house strung along the imposing round stairs, which is the focus of both the building and the area, wraps around an internal garden zone or courtyard. The floor plan system has proven to be a logical, exemplary and progressive one, containing apartments with flexible spaces.

exterior

© Szabó József, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1978/6

exterior

© Szentirmai Boglárka, source: a szerző

detail photo

© Szabó József, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1978/6

detail photo

© Szabó József, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1978/6

exterior

© Szabó József, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1978/6

interior

© Szabó József, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1978/6

interior

© Szabó József, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1978/6

floor plan

© Horváth Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1978/6

floor plan

© Horváth Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1978/6

floor plan

© Horváth Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1978/6

cross-section

© Horváth Lajos, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1978/6

Károly Jurcsik, Apartments, Toboz Street, District III, Budapest, 1977

Designed by Károly Jurcsik, this prominent representative of traditional architecture was an expressive apartment house for its time with a unique tone. Despite the tightness of the steep hillside site on Remetehegy, it is a development based on an ingenious concept, containing a total of 56 apartments in the four-storey building that echoes chain-condos. The overall articulation and dynamism results from the varied depths of the rooms that change level by level. The dimensions of the rooms, tailor-made to meet the individual needs of residents, and the shifts in volume are characteristic means of façade design. The method of development, expression of mass and the surfaces created by exposed raw brick – all contribute to the consistent architectural design.

exterior

© Zsitva Tibor, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1984/6, Lapkiadó vállalat, Budapest

exterior

© Zsitva Tibor, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1984/6, Lapkiadó vállalat, Budapest

exterior

© Zsitva Tibor, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1984/6, Lapkiadó vállalat, Budapest

exterior

© Zsitva Tibor, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1984/6, Lapkiadó vállalat, Budapest

exterior

© Zsitva Tibor, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1984/6, Lapkiadó vállalat, Budapest

floor plan

© Jurcsik Károly, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1984/6, Lapkiadó vállalat, Budapest

cross-section

© Jurcsik Károly, source: Magyar Építőművészet, 1984/6, Lapkiadó vállalat, Budapest